Category Archive:

Regehr to Buffalo: it’s Official

0

Regehr has made up his mind.

The Calgary Sun reports that Robyn has waived the no movement clause in his contract that had stalled the trade. It was a clause that he worked hard to earn for himself and his family, being a part of the Flames since 1999.

The  huge 6-3, 225 rear-guard immediately becomes a big factor in Pegula’s three-year Cup plan. He’s on contract for two more years, and with 180 hits and 142 blocked shots last season, is now one of the best, if not the best, Sabres defenseman. (He would have lead the Sabres in both categories.)

A Regehr-Myers tandem will be a frightening thing for opposing forwards to behold.

RobynRegehr2 Regehr to Buffalo: its Official

The thinking is over. Welcome to the B-lo, Robyn.

Purportedly, the whole deal is Regehr and Kotalik (welcome back, Ales) for Chris Butler, Paul Byron, and a 2nd rounder, but these other pieces are yet to be confirmed by either side.

It is a good deal for both sides.  Butler will be a good second pairing in Calgary, and Byron is NHL ready. In Buffalo, Regehr becomes a huge part of a Cup run.

Again, while it may have been frustrating for fans, it’s important to note that Regehr did the right thing by utilizing that NMC that he worked so hard and long for. This was the biggest decision of his hockey career, and folks, he’s got a family to think about.

So, to the Regehr clan, let me be one of the first to say:

“Welcome to Hockey Heaven.”

Go Sabres.

share save 171 16 Regehr to Buffalo: its Official

Continue Reading

Robyn Regehr: One Big, Nasty Domino

7

He’s sleeping on it.

Robyn Regehr has been with the Calgary Flames for a long, long time – since 1999, in fact. Yesterday, his agent let him know that he had been traded to Buffalo.

Regehr put his phone, his agent, the Flames, the Sabres, and the fans of both on hold.

You see, Regehr has a “no movement clause” in his contract which states, upon a trade, he has the power of veto.

The story that unfolded on Twitter was a sight to behold – will he accept the trade? Who might we be sending to Calgary in return? What Regehr brings to the table for the Sabres is formidable. For more on all of that, head on over to “Black & Blue and Gold” and read Phil’s post.  As usual, you’ll be glad that you did.

Readers of BSN know all too well how important it is that the Sabres “veteranize” their defense if they are to win a Cup, so adding a stud like Regehr has me already looking forward to losing sleep as I await his decision.  He’s 31, but losing sleep is justified over a guy like this – his 180 hits and 142 blocked shots would have lead the Sabres in both categories last season. Oh, and for all of those hits, he only went to the sin bin for 58 minutes.

share save 171 16 Robyn Regehr: One Big, Nasty Domino

Continue Reading

Stanley Cup 101: Sabres Cup Dreams Hinge on Bolstering Defense

0

Note: this is being re-posted today (October 4th) as part of our 2011-12 season preview. While written in June, the information below is more relevant now than ever.

 

I’m donning my professor’s cap today.

Remember my cute little “picket fence defense” lecture?

No?  Sigh.  Well pay attention now kids, because this stuff is important.  And it will be on the test – the test that is a Stanley Cup Final. Got your attention now, I bet.  Good.  Moving on.

Back before the playoffs started, I analyzed what was one of the more glaring weaknesses on the Sabres roster – their young defense. Since then, the Sabres collapsed out of the first round, and Lindy Ruff didn’t waste much time in declaring that one of the team’s top priorities in the off-season will be to “develop a lockdown pair.”

DangerDangerHighVoltageWhenWeTouchWhenWeDance 300x167 Stanley Cup 101: Sabres Cup Dreams Hinge on Bolstering Defense

When all else fails, buy the school a building. Or in our case, a new defense.

I know that many Sabres fans would love for Darcy Reiger to take his new, fat, diamond studded Sabres wallet and hand it straight over to Brad Richards’ agent when UFA negotiations open up on July 1st.  Admittedly, I’m one of them.  I’m a glutton for goals, and could only imagine how many we would be all gorging on if Richards was lined up between Vanek and Stafford.

But folks, we must remain focused.  Our problem at defense hasn’t gone away.  And it’s a big problem.

From that initial lecture:

(On March 18th) The Sabres have 203 goals for and 202 goals against.  This equal ratio is a stat that has been dogging them for months. They can’t seem to score more goals then they allow, and I find that disturbing.  What is more disturbing is every team ahead of Buffalo, save Tampa Bay, enjoys a wide winning margin in that category.  (Carolina posts a terrible 198/212.) Brad Boyes was a nice addition for the stretch run, but this team is going to learn to have to finish as well as play smarter defense – and quickly – if they are to make the playoffs, or survive the 1st round.

Since the 18th, the Sabres have gone 5-1-1.  Accordingly, their goals for/goals against ratio improved dramatically, to 226/214.  It’s a telling stat: Carolina has gone 4-1 since the 18th, and their ratio has markedly improved to 220/228.

Stick with me here, class.  I’ve gone back and bold-faced the key points, and will continue below:

So what does it all mean?

For Buffalo, it means that the Sabres, for the greater portion of the regular season, have not been able to score enough goals to keep up with the amount that they let in.  Their offense has scored enough goals (226) to be ranked 4th in the East in that category, trailing only Philadelphia (243), Boston (232), and Tampa Bay (230).

The Sabres’ offense is great, but their defense is, well, not so great. The teams ahead of them, those considered to be front-runners for a shot at the Cup, all show a commanding mastery of the goals for/goals against ratio, and it’s no coincidence – teams control the scoreboard by keeping all three zones under control.  It’s the Sabres’ play in their back end – the first step of every hockey rush, and the front lines of defense against a flurry from the opposition – that have kept them out of Cup talk, let alone much playoff talk.

The obvious statement from the professor troll in the front row here is “Ah yes, defense does win championships.”  This is where I glare at said troll and say “Don’t cheapen my lectures with cliches.”  There really is a lot to consider when putting a championship defense together, folks – and we’ll look at how that has been done over the last 10 years.  Let’s quickly finish up reviewing this previous lecture, first.  (Exasperated raspberry sigh from the dude in the back row, and pen clicking all over the place, I know, I know – stick with me.)

Buffalo is no lock for the playoffs, and the reason for this is the failure to be reliable in all three zones of the ice.  Lindy Ruff has implemented a style of play – “The System” – which is supposed to keep all players, at all times, focused on controlling the puck, the play, and the game.  The Sabres do their best, but their young defense just isn’t smart and experienced enough yet. In fact, Buffalo only has three defenders over the age of 24.  A disturbing list:

  • Steve Montador, 31
  • Jordan Leopold, 30
  • Shaone Morrisson, 28
  • Chris Butler, 24
  • Andrej Sekera, 24
  • Marc-Andre Gragnani, 24
  • Mike Weber, 23
  • Tyler Myers, 21

Of those guys over 24, Morrisson has hardly been a defensive stalwart this season, and Leopold/Montador have not been able to stay on the ice. Indeed, if there is a weakness of the Blue and Gold that teams are going to expose until the end of this hockey year, it is going to be the green defense corps.  Of all places, it is in their own zone, from where the team must take it’s most important steps, where their Achilles Heel is exposed.

I put that last sentence in bold because I really dig it.

Anyway, the Sabres problem is not effectually at center.  Yes, they certainly need to add more talent and depth at that position, but last season proved that they certainly have no problem scoring goals.  Brad Richards is a sexy idea, I get that – but if adding him means ignoring the need to augment our defense corps, then our Stanley Cup dreams are likely doomed.

Now, let’s talk about how a championship defense is made.

Bruce McCurdy of the Edmonton Journal wrote a smart piece that not only confirmed my worries about our green defense, but provided an analysis of all Cup-winning team defenses from the last ten years (this year’s Bruins excluded).  The results of his study are truly damning of our current roster.

Please welcome our guest lecturer for the day.  Take it away, Bruce:

My own approach here will (namely be) to examine the defence corps of all Stanley Cup champions over the last decade. How did the winners go about assembling their blueline crews? Let’s have a quick look team-by-team and then draw some broader conclusions.

2001AvsDefense Stanley Cup 101: Sabres Cup Dreams Hinge on Bolstering Defense

Bruce's first slide.

(After referencing the next 9 winning defenses, McCurdy went on to assess his findings):

As a whole, the champion defencemen were a veteran group. The average age was something over 30, with the top-pairing guys averaging a year or two more than that. Among 28 minute-munchers who averaged over 20 minutes a night (highlighted in bold), fifteen were 30 or older, just three 25 or younger.

Each of the last four Stanley Cup champs has featured a major UFA signing on the back end.

Thank you, Bruce.  I’ll take it from here.

This season, our defense was exposed.  It was exposed in the regular season.  It was exposed in the playoffs.  This is not a defense that gets to the Big Dance.  This is the kind of defense that your own offense has to outscore.

I do believe that Sekera, Butler, Weber, Gragnani, and of course, Myers, are all going to evolve into top-notch defenders in their own niches, as they get older.  The problem right now, however, is Ryan Miller is 31, and he is getting older too.  The “old core” of Roy, Pominville, Vanek, et al simply cannot afford to wait for this group of young defensemen to mature.  Pegula has this team on a very specific course right now – to win a Cup in three years.  In order to make that possible, balance has to be restored between the offense and defense.

There are plenty of UFA defensemen available this summer that fit this very simple but desperate need.  Meanwhile, the Sabres do have good trading power with these kids on the back end – as well as several blue chip defensive prospects.  Buffalo would be wise to use this cache to either regain that 2nd round pick that they lost in the Brad Boyes trade – or dare I dream, to make a package deal to lure a stud center like Paul Stastny away from a team.

From here, what needs to be done is clear.  The defense has to be bolstered.  It can be done, and at the same time, the center position can be improved.

It’s now up to Headmaster Darcy to make it happen.

Class… DISMISSED!

Go Sabres.

See also: “We’ve got a lot of Defensemen: How to Add Bieksa, Ehrhoff, or Wisniewski;” “Target: Brent Burns;” “Target: Paul Stastny

share save 171 16 Stanley Cup 101: Sabres Cup Dreams Hinge on Bolstering Defense

Continue Reading

Quick Hits: Kevin Sylvester and Danny Gare to Call Games; Drury to Retire

0

There will be no call for Drury duty in Buffalo after all.

Larry Brooks of the New York Post is reporting today that the Rangers cannot buy out their captain, due to his lingering knee injury.  In fact, the injury is degenerative, and it looks like the 35 year old will miss the entire upcoming season, an event that will force him into retirement.

Whether you wanted Drury back with the Sabres or not, no one wanted his career to end this way.

Drury will close out his 12 year career with 892 NHL regular-season games, in which the Little League World Series’ winning pitcher from Trumbull, Connecticut recorded 615 points (255-360).  In 130 playoff games, he scored 88 points (47-41).

GareAlumniDay 300x193 Quick Hits: Kevin Sylvester and Danny Gare to Call Games; Drury to Retire

Danny Gare at Alumni Day. Sadly, we may be seeing Drury at the next one of these things.

Meanwhile, the Sabres announced yesterday that Kevin Sylvester will make the play-by-play with Danny Gare at his side for select away games for the upcoming season.  Sylvester is the likely eventual replacement for Rick Jeanerette, who is hoping to extend his career by taking the brunt of the travel away from his schedule.

If you forgot what Sylvester’s style is like, here’s a video from last season where he called a Drew Stafford hattie against the Bruins.

Go Sabres.

 

share save 171 16 Quick Hits: Kevin Sylvester and Danny Gare to Call Games; Drury to Retire

Continue Reading

The Obligatory Chris Drury Post

0

I totally predicted this buy-out back in 2007.

Not that I am happy that it happened – hey, it wasn’t Drury’s fault that he was handed a king’s ransom to dress up for his favorite childhood team.  It wasn’t his fault that his body sadly began to show signs of age.

ChrisDrurysabres The Obligatory Chris Drury Post

Oh captain, my captain!

A lot has been written on Drury since the news of the buy-out broke, so I am not going to waste your time with my own assessment of what comes next.  I’ve got a different approach for my readers.

share save 171 16 The Obligatory Chris Drury Post

Continue Reading

Email Updates

Get instant updates of BSN posts via email!

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Recent Comments

Switch to our mobile site